Primitive Isolation Tactics interview on Disaster Sources (CKUT)

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Scream & Writhe
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Primitive Isolation Tactics interview on Disaster Sources (CKUT)

Post by Scream & Writhe »

https://ckut.ca/playlists/shows/12486

I was recently interviewed by fellow board-member Disaster Sources for his program of the same name on Montreal's CKUT radio. We discussed Primitive Isolation Tactics as well as the nature of noise and its transcendental properties. Tracks from the Jackals Howling Across the Deserts of Time and Compiling Beliefs tapes (Lead Lozenges and Buried In Slag And Debris, respectively) intersperse the interview.

It's a 2-hour program, with the interview segment taking up the first 40 minutes or so. After the interview Aaron curated a nice experimental/noise playlist, signing off with the goat, MSBR.

I think some folks here will enjoy the listen. My thanks to Aaron for setting it up.
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Primitive Isolation Tactics
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murmur
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Re: Primitive Isolation Tactics interview on Disaster Sources (CKUT)

Post by murmur »

Really enjoyed this. Thanks for sharing!
Reachingneedles
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Re: Primitive Isolation Tactics interview on Disaster Sources (CKUT)

Post by Reachingneedles »

fantastic interview!
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Re: Primitive Isolation Tactics interview on Disaster Sources (CKUT)

Post by Scream & Writhe »

Thanks for listening!

It seems like CKUT is having a hard time keeping a working archive link going, so here's a WeTransfer link to download an mp3 of the interview segment until they get their end sorted out... https://we.tl/t-W06R4CNu8h
Scream & Writhe distro and Absurd Exposition label - https://screamandwrithe.com
Initial Shock Noise Festival - https://initialshock.screamandwrithe.com
Primitive Isolation Tactics
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Capers
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Re: Primitive Isolation Tactics interview on Disaster Sources (CKUT)

Post by Capers »

Thanks for the flattering shoutout, and no thanks for making me blush on the bus to work.

But damn, very good talk. The part about the urge to keep up with EVERYTHING in noise, as opposed to the more sane cherry picking fandom of other genres, is something I've thought about alot myself. When my private time was decimated a couple of years ago, I was frustrated about not being able to know about everything that went on in the noise scene. Nowadays I'm more than fine with it. It's not that I play it safe now, only buying or trading for what I know I will enjoy. I still take chances. But just as yet another part of this talk touches upon, I try to pull the trigger on releases that somehow come across as more important, and skip all the shorter inbetween-things. And I think I've developed a good nose for which ones those are (you can't conpletely rule out tapes and go for CDs now though). I miss getting to know every record and tape I get inside out, despite their flaws, because I have them and I have to listen to them. Trying to get back to that.

Which brings me to the thing about flaws. All my all time favorite records have flaws, worthless parts, tracks you simple wait out to get some place more exciting. They bring out more than the best of the good parts. Elevates them, let them shine even more. Build momentum, in a way. Without Escape and Trapped Under Ice, Ride The Lightning wouldn't be half as great. (I'm way off topic already). As I'm taking for granted everyone agrees fully with me, does this principle apply to noise as well? As in long form noise. Does a sloppy section in the middle of an otherwise raging 30 minute track kill the whole thing?
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Re: Primitive Isolation Tactics interview on Disaster Sources (CKUT)

Post by December Man »

Capers wrote: Thu Mar 23, 2023 5:47 pm Thanks for the flattering shoutout, and no thanks for making me blush on the bus to work.

But damn, very good talk. The part about the urge to keep up with EVERYTHING in noise, as opposed to the more sane cherry picking fandom of other genres, is something I've thought about alot myself. When my private time was decimated a couple of years ago, I was frustrated about not being able to know about everything that went on in the noise scene. Nowadays I'm more than fine with it. It's not that I play it safe now, only buying or trading for what I know I will enjoy. I still take chances. But just as yet another part of this talk touches upon, I try to pull the trigger on releases that somehow come across as more important, and skip all the shorter inbetween-things. And I think I've developed a good nose for which ones those are (you can't conpletely rule out tapes and go for CDs now though). I miss getting to know every record and tape I get inside out, despite their flaws, because I have them and I have to listen to them. Trying to get back to that.

Which brings me to the thing about flaws. All my all time favorite records have flaws, worthless parts, tracks you simple wait out to get some place more exciting. They bring out more than the best of the good parts. Elevates them, let them shine even more. Build momentum, in a way. Without Escape and Trapped Under Ice, Ride The Lightning wouldn't be half as great. (I'm way off topic already). As I'm taking for granted everyone agrees fully with me, does this principle apply to noise as well? As in long form noise. Does a sloppy section in the middle of an otherwise raging 30 minute track kill the whole thing?
Was contemplating this a bit today. I would tend to agree with you that the "bad" (or at least, less standout) parts contextualize the best of it. There was a point when I was very obsessed with short form, "all killer, no filler" type releases whereas now I really like a longer piece where I can't quite always remember everything and I need to revisit it over and over.

Honestly, I think it applies more to noise than more traditional song oriented rock or metal where you get the breaks and can more easily pinpoint the "good" or climatic parts.
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